Remembering A Crazy Class Act

BY VICTOR LAZNIK

Staff Writer

A few Months Since his Untimely Death, Robin Williams Still Shines!
A few Months Since his Untimely Death, Robin Williams Still Shines!

Following the tragic death of comedian Robin Williams, looking back on his great performances, it is clear why so many people miss him along with his immense talent.

Williams first started as a stand-up comic.  A television series called “Mork and Mindy” premiered in 1978, where he played the energetic alien Mork from the planet Ork. The show ran for four years and earned Williams a Golden Globe Award for Best TV Actor – Musical/Comedy.

In 1987, Williams starred in his first controversial film, “Good Morning Vietnam,” where a brutally honest radio D.J. talks openly about what was actually happening during the Vietnam War. The military establishment hated him, but the soldiers loved him. This film earned him his first of four Academy Award nominations.

His next Academy Award nomination came just two years later in 1989 for “Dead Poets Society.” He played John Keating, who brought the ways of being expressive and true to oneself to students.

The two following children’s movies he acted in were “Hook” in 1991 and “Aladdin” in 1992. “Hook” is a more grim but interesting take on Peter Pan. This film focuses on what would happen if Peter Banning was kidnapped and grew up only to have to rescue the lost boys from the iron grasp of Captain Hook. In “Aladdin,” Williams brought the beloved Genie to life, and won a Special Achievement Award at the Golden Globes.

Robin Williams charmed audiences over several decades with his diverse characters in comedic and dramatic films. Stock Photos.
Robin Williams charmed audiences over several decades with his diverse characters in comedic and dramatic films. Stock Photos.

Williams then starred in the 1993 romantic-comedy and drama, “Mrs. Doubtfire,” where he played Daniel Hillard, who sneaks his way back into his house as a nanny for hire named Mrs. Doubtfire when kicked out by his wife.

In 1995, Williams played Alan Parrish in “Jumanji.” This movie was about a game that came to life, and the only way to stop its terror was to finish the game.

Then in 1997, Williams starred in two films.  The first one was “Flubber” in which he played Professor Philip Brainard, and the second film was “Good Will Hunting” where he played Sean Maguire. This performance won Williams his only Academy Award.

Williams charmed families once again as President Teddy Roosevelt in the “Night at the Museum” franchise, which has had three installments from 2006 to 2014. He also provided multiple voices in the 2006 film “Happy Feet” and the 2011 sequel “Happy Feet 2.”

Unfortunately, tragedy struck in August when Williams committed suicide. Despite this, his spirit will live on in the hearts of his fans and in his films for years to come.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *